Jour 4 et Jour 5

JOUR 4

Eeek l know l said l’d post a blog a day but yesterday was a little crazy! l didn’t get home until 11:30 and l just couldn’t be bothered to post (bad l know, but my bed was just calling my name.)

l did a HUGE grocery shop, l bought so many vegetables, l think people thought l bought half the produce section lol

l find that l need to eat larger quantities now that my diet is 80% veggies.

JOUR 5

Today was another hospital day: appointments & scans- the usual.

My biggest challenge so far with this lifestyle is finding delicious AND nutritious meals when I’m out & about.

I actually ate at Spring Rolls and was impressed with their vegetarian dishes. They used numerous vegetables to dress up the plate. I appreciate a variety of vegetables instead of just the typical carrots and broccoli (boringggggg.) *Pictures are posted under lunch*

DAILY TIP(S)

I had a few hours in-between hospital appointments so we decided to grab some food. I have my favourite restaurants around the hospital, that I ate more meals at than I can remember. That being said, my favourite meals at those restaurants include meat and are not plant based meals.

I believe it to be more promising if you go to new plant based restaurants OR restaurants you have never been to- this way you’ll discover new favourites instead of relying on your old meat based favourites.

The comfort in knowing you like a dish is great but when you order it meatless it might not be quite the same.

DAILY RECIPE(S)

Zucchini Chocolate Muffins
(My good friend Google- I altered the recipe to my liking)
12 medium size muffins

  • 1 1/4 cup of whole wheat flour
  • 1/3 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder or cacao powder (I mixed them)
  • 1 tsp of baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp of salt
  • 2 melted tbsp of coconut oil (be sure to let it cool a little bit)
  • 1 egg (or flaxseed meal substitute)
  • 1 tsp of pure vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup of agave
  • 1 cup of shredded zucchini
  • 1 ripe banana mushed (you can also use a 1/4 cup of applesauce works just the same)
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1/2 of you fav chocolate chips (I like semi sweet)
  1. Preheat oven at 350 F
  2. In a medium size bowl whisk together ALL dry ingredients (except the chocolate chips)
  3. In another bowl, whisk together ALL wet ingredients (this includes the zucchini)
  4. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix.
  5. Once mixed, add the chocolate chips.
  6. Bake for approximately 25 minutes (the time varies depending on the size of your muffins.)

DAILY MEALS

Breakfast

My fav- Chia seed pudding with blueberries and almond slices!img_0507.jpg

Lunch

I had two appetizers and one main (I promise I didn’t eat all of the food- there was SO much!)

Mango salad (bottom left), veggie rice cold wraps (to the right) & vegetarian pad thai (top left).

Dinner

Dinner was a late one, so I had some left over homemade chilli I had frozen. I defrosted it in the pan and put it on top of some rice. As the chilli was defrosting I roasted some veggies (sweet potatoes, brussel sprouts and asparagus.) I tossed them in some olive oil and put a medium amount of pepper. I baked the veggies at 380 F for 45 minutes. They were so good, even my boyfriend who is not a fan of those veggies loved them!

Rookie me forgot to take a picture of my roasted veggies- next time I promise.

Snacks 

Apple and some peanut butter.

Crackers and some cheese (my first time having cheese in almost a week.)

A freshly baked croissant (gosh darn I love pastries.)

Fresh Mango

Blue grapes

Drinks

Water

Chai latte from Starbs made with coconut milk. Honestly, I can’t do the almond milk in my lattes but the coconut milk taste the same as regular milk!

Xo

*Jour 6 will be posted tonight- February 28th*

The warrior project

Talking about an illness that has impacted the person you are can be extremely difficult. It brings back memories that you may have spent a long time trying to forget. That being said, sharing your story can be beneficial for those around you as well as yourself.

“If you avoid your feelings, you also avoid understanding who you really are.”

This is why I believe it’s truly important to share your experiences and traumas with others to help yourself overcome them.

I understand that sharing experiences and traumas, that are associated to illnesses, can be difficult but, a new year means new goals am I right??


Are you or someone you know a CANCER warrior , CARDIOVASCULAR warrior, ANXIETY warrior, DOWN SYNDROME warrior, AUTISM warrior, DEPRESSION warrior, MULTIPLESCLEROSIS warrior, LUPUS warrior, BIPOLAR warrior??? Or a WARRIOR of any sort under the age of twenty five?

If so PLEASE message me (or email anyselebeau@yahoo.ca with the subject warrior project) & add yourself to the Facebook page https://m.facebook.com/AnysePermanentlyPink/

If you would like to participate but don’t want to share your name that is okay, you will remain anonymous.

Your participation requires a minimal amount of effort.

I’m looking forward to hearing from some of you.

Xox Anyse

My Good Old Friend Chemo

Let me start with sorry for the time in-between posts… It has been a busy few weeks!

If I’m being totally honest I haven’t posted because I’ve been trying to forget my first chemo experience. It started off fine, a little stressful with accessing the port but nevertheless it was going pretty well.

Somewhere between receiving the chemo and my first night at the hospital I began to feel the effects. The nausea started slowly till I inevitably ended up over a bucket in the bathroom with tears running down my face because lets be honest: puking SUCKS- especially when you know it’s induced. (Puking with a healthy body sucks, let alone when your body consists of cancer cells.)

I made my way back to bed and the nurse offered another nausea medicine to help relieve my symptoms. She gave me these little white pills you put under your tongue. Shortly after they began to melt, my eyes began to close and my brain felt like it was incapable of processing anything. I’ve never felt anything like it.

I don’t drink but I think that’s the closest I’ve ever been to drunk.

Ingesting the little white pills is the last thing I remember. The few days after ingesting the pills are a blur. I don’t even have any recollection of leaving the hospital; I haven’t decided if that’s a good thing or not. I think that’s why I’ve been so scared to write about it because so much was forgotten.

Once home the initial days are still a bit of a blur. I was on 2 nausea medicines and sent home with those famous little white pills (that I had NO intention of using). I was on home hydration which means my port was hooked up to an IV for 12 hours every night. Every time the doorbell rang I knew it was time; theres something about having my port used that turns my stomach.

I initially was so nauseous I couldn’t even sit up. I laid in bed while someone fed me little pieces of watermelon and cheese. Those were the only things I could stomach. As the days went on the nausea seemed to subside but I had to take things slowly or it would creep up on me once again.

My body had been poisoned and I was slowly learning how to cope with it.

Xo

 

“Where you live shouldn’t dictate if you live”

If you’re capable of reading this, it’s likely that you live somewhere relatively nice, where your basic needs are met.

Imagine living somewhere where your basic needs AND human right are never met. Everyday life would be difficult and I’m assuming (at times) quite frustrating; to feel stuck and unable to make a change, simply because of your geographical location.
EVERYDAY, children suffer as a result of where they live. They are unable to thrive in life due to the inaccessibility of health care, something many of us take for granted. Every year, nearly 7 million children worldwide die of preventable diseases. In other words, had those children been somewhere in western civilization with access to a doctor or medical facility, it’s likely that they would have survived.

“About 29,000 children under the age of five – 21 each minute – die every day, mainly from preventable causes. More than 70 per cent of almost 11 million child deaths every year are attributable to six causes: diarrhoea, malaria, neonatal infection, pneumonia, preterm delivery, or lack of oxygen at birth.”

-UNICEF

Children who suffer of non preventable diseases in these countries have no chance at life. If they don’t have access to basic healthcare, they most definitely don’t have access to specialty healthcare for illnesses such as cancer, MS, cystic fibrosis, etc. This is a result of:  lack of knowledge, lack of equipment and lack of funds.

Being both a cancer survivor and patient, I can personally vouch for the importance of medical advancement. If I was a child in a country without access to health care, I wouldn’t be here today.
We must not only be citizens in our own backyard but also citizens of the world.

Perhaps doing your part is simply recognizing how lucky you are to live in a country that gives you options. Death is still a possibility, even in Canada (depending on the severity of the disease.)  However, with access to healthcare, you have the chance to fight for your life: an opportunity many wouldn’t even dream of.

Help where and when you can.Whether you volunteer, donate (join the fight with SickKids) or spread knowledge on the subject.

Xo

Cancer

Everyones past helped shape who they are today so it’s inevitable that cancer helped shaped me.                                                                                                                                                            

I was diagnosed with cancer for the first time at the age of 2; it was a brain tumour situated  behind my left eye. I underwent treatment for months, with little results. My family was devastated by the idea of losing a loved one at such a young age. My mom insisted they keep treating me until my little fragile body couldn’t take anymore. After 12 weeks of radiation, and week long chemo treatments my tumour began to shrink. Eventually my oncologist was able to shrink the tumour, to ruffly the size of a loony, as well as eliminate the cancer cells. Years of fighting finally payed off- It created a miracle… ME

In addition to having underwent a childhood cancer, I was born with the P53 gene. This gene is essentially an error in my DNA that creates masses of cancer. Because of this gene the odds of me having cancer again were high- much much higher than the average person. In all honesty though, I never worried about it. I always told myself it’s pointless to worry about something that was out of my control. Weather I worried about cancer or not, if my biology insisted I get it- there was nothing I could do to change that.

January 6th 2017, shortly after my 18th birthday, the inevitable happened- I was diagnosed with cancer for the second time. I had been sleeping more and frequent headaches during the night began to affect the quality of my sleep. Th0se around me believed it was the lack of routine in my busy university lifestyle but something inside of me knew there was an underlying issue. I procrastinated going to the doctor during the holidays until I realized that my health was in my own hands. No one was going to advocate for me anymore; if I wanted an answer it was my responsibility to ask the questions.

After reaching out to my new oncologist nurse a few times, I realized she didn’t believe my symptoms were associated to anything major. She repeatedly encouraged me to go see my family doctor; however, something about her reaction was too calming. I decided to contact my old oncologist nurse whom assumed another role at the hospital. I explained my symptoms and that my current nurse was disregarding the importance of me seeing my oncologist. She contacted my current oncologist nurse and explained to her the importance of me being seen by my doctor. [I later found out, by my oncologist, that I only received an appointment because I spoke with my old nurse.]

The weeks to follow are a little bit of a blur. Everyone was in shock that this healthy young girl could possibly have such an awful disease growing inside of her AGAIN. By the end of January I underwent a massive surgery to remove the tumour, as well as reconstruct the left mandible with bone and tissue taken from my leg. The surgery was roughly 12 hours. The recovery time was estimated at 12-13 days but I was out in 6. I slowly began to recover.

XO